Travel

The best restaurants in Jamaica, from jerk chicken to saltfish fritters

Jamaica is arguably best known for its white sandy beaches and reggae music, but the island is also deservedly famous for its cuisine. Be sure to try local specialties such as ackee and saltfish, Ital cuisine (a natural diet free from meat, additives and chemicals), curried goat and patties – be it at corner shops, beach shacks or the fine dining restaurants that dot the island. And if, heaven forbid, you don’t develop a taste for spiced Jamaican fare, there’s an array of international dining options in the main tourist towns as well as the all-inclusive resorts.

Read the article here: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/caribbean/jamaica/articles/jamaica-restaurants/

Where to drink in Jamaica, from laid-back beach bars to all-night dub parties

amaica is famed for its hospitality, and the island’s nightlife doesn’t disappoint: whether you’re after a trendy lounge, a low-key beach bar or want to dance until daylight in a Kingston club, you’re sure to find something happening here every night of the week. Big areas for nightlife include Jamaica’s capital, Kingston, and it’s second city, Montego Bay – check the Daily Gleaner, the Jamaica Observer and the Jamaica Star for the low-down on who's playing when and where – but wherever you go, there is music to be found. This, after all, is the island that created reggae. Are you ready to get your groove on?

Read the article here: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/caribbean/jamaica/articles/jamaica-nightlife/

Hotel review: Malmaison London

“This British brand’s London property is housed in an elegant white-fronted Victorian building that was once a nurse’s home. The Mal bar and brasserie draws in guests and locals alike, while rooms – which squeeze in fun touches such as hanging wine glasses – will suit anyone up for some cosmopolitan cool.”

Read the review here:

This British brand’s London property is housed in an elegant white-fronted Victorian building that was once a nurse’s home. The Mal bar and brasserie draws in guests and locals alike, while rooms – which squeeze in fun touches such as hanging wine glasses – will suit anyone up for some cosmopolitan cool.

Read the review here:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/europe/united-kingdom/england/london/city/hotels/malmaison-london-hotel/

Hotel review: Malmaison London

“This British brand’s London property is housed in an elegant white-fronted Victorian building that was once a nurse’s home. The Mal bar and brasserie draws in guests and locals alike, while rooms – which squeeze in fun touches such as hanging wine glasses – will suit anyone up for some cosmopolitan cool.”

Read my review for Telegraph Travel here:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/europe/united-kingdom/england/london/city/hotels/malmaison-london-hotel/

Caribbean cruises: what to do on land and where to stay

Our insiders pick the top spots in the region’s main cruise hubs, and explain how to spend time before your Caribbean voyage

SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO
By Kaye Holland

More than a dozen cruise lines include San Juan on their Caribbean itineraries — and for good reason. Puerto Rico’s charismatic capital has powder-white beaches, historic forts, an incredible dining scene and sizzling salsa nightlife. Royal Caribbean, Norwegian and Celebrity have departures starting here.

What to do 
Explore Old San Juan’s beautifully restored Spanish colonial district, chock-full of cobblestone streets, pastel-coloured buildings, and fortresses, then head to Balneario el Escambron, a palm-fringed white-sand beach near Old San Juan. El Yunque is a lovely tropical rainforest with hiking trails (entry US$4, fs.usda.gov/elyunque).

Where to eat and drink
You can’t visit San Juan without sampling mofongo, mashed plantains mixed with garlic, spices, meat and broth, served with scoops of rice. Ask a Sanjuanero where’s best and they’ll send you to Café Puerto Rico (mofongo from US$12, cafepuertorico.com). When night falls, shake it in the neighbourhood of Santurce at late-night salsa clubs.

Where to stay
Treat yourself to a night at the 17th-century Hotel El Convento (doubles from US$152 a night, elconvento.com), a short stroll from the cruise-ship piers. The Dreamcatcher in the Ocean Park district is San Juan’s only vegetarian hotel (rooms from US$159 a night, dreamcatcherpr.com). It has 13 individually designed rooms, some with outdoor showers. Guests can hang out in hammocks and sign up for daily yoga classes.

Miss T's Kitchen in Ochee

MONTEGO BAY AND OCHO RIOS, JAMAICA
By Kaye Holland

One of the Caribbean’s largest and liveliest islands, Jamaica is home to five cruise ports, but most cruises call at Montego Bay or Ocho Rios — Mo Bay or Ochee, as they are lovingly known. Many Brits holiday in Mo Bay, and Ocho Rios is just as worthy of your time. Cruises don’t typically start from these ports, but even with a couple of days to explore during a stop-off on your voyage you can get under the island’s skin.

What to do
No trip to Montego Bay is complete without a visit to Doctor’s Cave Bathing Club, one of the island’s iconic beaches (entry US$6, doctorscavebathingclub.com). At Rose Hall (tour US$20, rosehall.com), legend has it that the ghost of Annie Palmer, the plantation’s former owner and a multiple murderer, haunts the imposing 1770s mansion. Twenty miles east of Ocho Rios is Firefly, Noël Coward’s hilltop abode (entry US$10, www.firefly-jamaica.com).

Where to eat and drink
Dress up for dinner at the Houseboat Grill, a colourful converted houseboat. The Caribbean-fusion menu might include grilled palm hearts (about US$8) followed by lobster mac’n’cheese (US$30, thehouseboatgrill.com). In Ochee try Miss T’s Kitchen’s home-style curried goat (US$24), served in a lovely garden, to the sound of — what else? — reggae (misstskitchen.com).